saditycents











{November 6, 2017}   The Struggle is Real

Its almost 1 am and this nursing mama should be asleep instead I am awake. I can’t even say I’m wide awake, I’m just barely awake, yet there is so much to do. How does one balance it all? How do you function as CFO of our home, chef, property manager, laundress, and full-time child care provider. All while trying to eak out a semblance of a career (which has take a major back seat, I mean right now its not even in the trunk, its hitched to a trailer and holding on for dear life), lose weight, stay presentable (which means doing my hair every day) , and trying to actually interact more than just feeding  the aforementioned child. Sure teaching her French right now is a little much, but I also don’t want her just staring at the ceilings between feedings and diaper changes. How do you accomplish it all? Right now it doesn’t feel like anything can be dropped. Don’t manage the finances and rental property? Don’t prepare whole food meals for the family? Don’t do laundry?

The go to answer is have your husband help more. But if he is already extremely helpful between classes and work and taking on a major portion of the cleaning all while dealing with Uncle Sam on a daily bases what more can you ask before you both are overwhelmed? Right now my solution is that I overload myself to keep from overloading him. It seems like men can’t handle stress at the level women can. I don’t know if there is an answer. There’s just the question at one in the morning. How do you balance it all? The struggle is so real.

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Once nausea subsided from the first trimester, heartburn kicked in. I am having a hard time not relying the go to over-the-counter medicines for relief. Most contain sodium bicarbonate and magnesium trisilicate which really isn’t healthy for pregnant women.  The go to advice is to avoid acidic foods, eat smaller meals, and avoid eating before bed. But I already do all of that. The other day, I ordered tea at a cafe. There was nothing to eat there except pastries and bread. I’m trying to reduce my sugar and anyways, bread give me heartburn. I literally had nothing but tea and… (you guest it) heartburn. So what’s a gal to do?

Here are some natural suggestions for heartburn. I’ve also added whether they worked for me:

  • Water – Basically this is the cure for everything in life. Pregnancy makes the consumption of water both necessary and difficult for me. I drink my water best in large gulps throughout the day, except when you have a growing person inside and hormones raging, consuming anything in large amounts just doesn’t happen. I sip water all day, but apparently not enough to reduce the fire in my chest.

  • Raw apple cider vinegar

  • Fresh lemon in water- This made my heartburn feel worse in my opinion.

  • Ginger tea

  • Coconut water

  • Fennel seeds

  • Peppermint

  • Yogurt or Milk

  • High Enzyme Foods

  • Fermented foods

  • HCL & Pepsin

  • Bentonite Clay – Now this is an old remedy from the south. The fact that it sells in health food stores for $10/ ounce is ridiculous to me. Especially since poor black women have been using it for years, and its use is consider low-end and almost witch crafty or superstitious. But whatever, it really does work and is good for adding nutrients to the body.

  • Aloe Vera – This is the best solution I have found. It last longer than anything else. Before aloe vera, I literally had been sleeping at. 90-degree angle. Anything less cause severe burning in my chest. I have been hard to avoid prescriptions so I am glad I finally discovered the drink I enjoyed in Korea actually is useful for my pregnancy. 

  • Almonds

 

Resources:

https://www.mamanatural.com/pregnancy-heartburn/

http://www.myhealthtips.in/2014/04/natural-cures-for-heartburn-in-pregnant-women.html



Image result for baby eating in the womb

So my first trimester has been one of survival. I have been nauseous more than not and I have what feels like an unnatural tiredness. Emotionally for me this is great because it means the baby is taking my energy and thriving. Nutritionally and physically, not so great. I have been struggling to eat and by doing so I’ve been struggling to get the proper nutrients. My food regimen that seemed to work so well only weeks ago makes me sick at the thought of it; I mean salmon, yuck!

So what do I do? I cut myself slack.

I find that being overly regimented has the opposite effect on my success so I allow myself to  eat whatever I can stomach. However I make sure to focus on some basic health habits to ensure health.

  • Prenatal Vitamins every day. This was hard because it was hard to stomach them at times. Little known fact, prenatal are most effective before and during the early stages of pregnancy. This is one thing I forced on myself, especially on days I never made it through an entire meal. There are a number of prenatal vitamins on the market.
    • Look for a prenatal vitamin that includes:

      • 400 micrograms (mcg) of folic acid (I personally prefer folate, the non-synthetic form of B-9).
      • 400 IU of vitamin D.
      • 200 to 300 milligrams (mg) of calcium.
      • 70 mg of vitamin C.
      • 3 mg of thiamine.
      • 2 mg of riboflavin.
      • 20 mg of niacin.
      • 6 mcg of vitamin B12.
      • 10 mg of vitamin E.
      • 15 mg of zinc.
      • 17 mg of iron.
      • 150 micrograms of iodine
  • DHA supplement. The best prenatal comes as a liquid, usually a form of fish or krill oil. If you can stomach it, adding it to a smoothie is a great use of them. If not a gel cap is better than nothing.
  • Water. Early on I learned that the 16 cups (or double normal intake) recommendation for water was unrealistic and discouraging. It requires a lot of chugging of water during a time when I was only capable of sips. My solution was 2 cups in the morning, 1 cup every time I woke up from a nap, and 1 before bed. The rest of the day I sipped. This got me between 6-8 cups of water a day. It’s not ideal but it was better than nothing.
  • Exercise was pretty nonexistent. I seriously felt like I was on bed rest, I was so tired.
  • My only real food requirement was something green or raw everyday.
  • We did continue with our castor oil massages without the heat to help encourage natural detoxing.

Here are some tips from other tips, but I encourage you to be gentle with your body and expectations of yourself.

  • Smoothies: I couldn’t do it, but others swear by them)
  • Crockpot soups: They’re easy. I can tell my husband to throw the ingredients in or I can do it and leave the room to avoid smells. Also, if you add the right ingredients they are very nutritious.
  • Salad commitment: I committed to a salad a day. This helped with nutrient intake and water intake. White breads and rice settled my stomach. Rather than make myself feel guilty, I made sure to eat a large salad every day. The truly was the “better than nothing” trimester. Salads also helped me avoid the dreaded constipation of pregnancy.
  • Indulge in the good stuff: If I found a healthy food I liked, I went all in until I got sick of it. Food nutrition isn’t a cut a dry thing. Many times your body will store excess nutrients so I loaded up on foods like guacamole, lentils, carrots, apples, oatmeal because those were foods I enjoyed for a time. I didn’t force feed myself anything that made me queasy.

References:

http://www.webmd.com/baby/guide/prenatal-vitamins#1

http://www.babypost.com/blogs/beautiful-baby-body-blog/best-foods-eat-during-first-trimester



{February 1, 2017}  

You know that time where life is happening so fast and all of its blog worthy but you can’t seem to keep up with it all? Yea, me too. The last six months have been a blur of blogable events and yet I haven’t really blogged. So I figured maybe if I just list everything that’s been going on then I can organize my thoughts and pump out some posts. So here we go:

  1. Husband and I developed a fertility diet for me after weeks of research based on some great books and blogs. 
  2. We found out we were pregnant after one cycle on the diet. Which was wonderful because we’d been trying for awhile and had received really distressing news from the doctor. I attribute a lot of this to faith in action. I had faith God would make a way, but I didn’t sit on my laurels either. 
  3. We celebrated a milestone birthday for hubby with a trip to Yellowstone National Park. It was amazing and we loved it. 
  4. Then I went about finding the right care provider by of course researching. Who would have know this sadity girl is crunchy when it comes to her baby. I wasn’t impressed with the apathetic or overly medical options I was being offered with traditional medicine so we picked a midwife. What! It’s actually becoming more common but mine is not associated with a hospital so for me that meant I could seek the care I want and not the treatments dictated to me. 
  5. I have had to do a lot of traveling for work and family in the last few months. Which has helped me come up with a pretty stellar travel “must haves” list for the pregnant woman. 
  6. I also switched my fertility diet and exercise routine to a prenatal one. I didn’t follow one particular plan but rather I took practice options from several to create a plan for a real pregnant person. You know one who is has a  below average fitness commitment and likes food (even if it does make her sick right now).
  7. I put together a registry early on based on great advice from my sister and mother, two vets in the game. It’s also gender neutral!
  8. I’ve resisted the new mom stereotype of everything must be new and instead opted for a Sadity Cents type nursery and baby preparation. 
  9. I’m prepping for taxes because organization and life don’t stop with a baby. 
  10. And of course cooking! I will say that’s fewer and far between because standing and smelling for too long just aren’t working right now. 
  11. As a bonus I figured out the man I married is awesome! And really is the best daddy-to-be. He’s consistently take on a number of chores and pampering techniques to make this a wonderful pregnancy. 

Follow the links, which I will add as I write the relevant posts. Said posts will be written in between naps, so please be patient. 🙂



{February 26, 2016}   Healthy Body to Healthy Baby

Hubby and I are completing our first year of marriage soon. According to our plan that means trying for a baby. I’ve worked hard over the last few years to get healthy. While I’m not as skinny as I would like to be, I would venture that I’m definitely in better shape than I was when I could fit into a size 4 dress ( I just PR’d in Crossfit). However, could I be better? Always. I’m entering my 30s so why not be just a little more cautious and make sure I’m at my prime when I conceive.

In recent months I’ve been attempting to focus less on a dress size and more on getting my body prepared for baby. I tried to find articles that discussed steps to a healthy pregnancy, but instead most of them were very generic. My type-A personality likes an actual list. Most gave the very basic and generic advice,  ‘get your body healthy.’ Not very helpful…

I mean we all want to be healthy. But how do I actually take steps to achieve that health? What does that look like?  What health concerns should I focus on preventing? So I made my own list, specific to my issues by doing a little reverse engineering of sorts.

Here’s my thought process: Why do women want to be healthy for pregnancy? To avoid complications. So rather than the generic instruction of “get healthy,” I decided to specifically target the most common complication in my health efforts. Hopefully by tailoring my health regimen in this manner I will decrease my likelihood of developing complications and increase my overall health.

Here are the most common general health issues in a pregnancy:

  • Anemia
  • Back Pain
  • Bleeding
  • Bleeding gums
  • Constipation
  • Cramp
  • Deep vein thrombosis (DVT)
  • Faintness
  • Feeling hot
  • Fibroid/ complications with uterine fibroids
  • Headaches
  • High blood pressure and pre-eclampsia
  • Incontinence
  • Indigestion and heartburn
  • Itching
  • Leaking nipples
  • Morning sickness and nausea
  • Nosebleeds
  • Urinating a lot
  • Pelvic pain
  • Piles (haemorrhoids)
  • Skin and hair
  • Sleeplessness
  • Stretch marks
  • Swollen ankles, feet, fingers
  • Teeth and gums
  • Tiredness
  • Vaginal discharge
  • Vaginal bleeding
  • Varicose veins
  • Weight/ Excessive Weight Gain

 

The highlighted health issues are the one’s I’ve witnessed in my own family or I am personally concerned about.

  1. Anemia
  2. Backache
  3. Cramps
  4. Feeling Hot/ Hot Flashes
  5. Fibroids
  6. Headaches
  7. High Blood Pressure/ Pre-Eclampsia
  8. Itching
  9. Pelvic Pain
  10. Teeth and gum issues
  11. Excessive Weight Gain

My strategy is to develop a health plan that targets these issues with natural means of relief. If I make it a way of life now, hopefully it will reduce or eliminate my susceptibility to these health concerns in the future. Stay tune for the full plan!

Resources

http://www.cdc.gov/reproductivehealth/maternalinfanthealth/pregcomplications.htm



{October 23, 2015}   Market Shopping in Korea 
A Dapper Dog at the Market

A Dapper Dog at the Market

As a military dependent, shopping overseas isn’t as tricky for us compared to others who don’t have the connection and support of a local base. We of course have the base commissary.  When I was in the states I loved the commissary because of their great prices. Overseas they have an awesome coupon policy (you can use expired coupons for up to six months overseas), friendly service (for the most part), and products from home. But the truth is there are somethings the commissary can’t achieve; like fresh local produce. You see the commissary is ran under an arm of the Department of Defense, which means it has government contracts it must fulfill, which for me means my fruit is often frozen, shipped, and defrosted, only to prematurely rot. So while I buy many of my staples at the commissary I like to shop locally for my fresh items. And to tell you the truth it’s almost always cheaper.

Almost every town or province in South Korea has a local outdoor market where farmers and shopkeepers set up booths and sell their produce and goods. Where I live the market is known to the locals as the Songbook market. The Americans call it the “4/9 market” because vendors set up on any day ending in 4 or 9 of every month. Another base has the 3/8 market;  you get the pattern. I reckon the same vendors travel to many local towns.

Anyway the 4/9 market can be intimidating. There are flurry of people pushing their way through the crowds, a lot of yelling from vendors trying to make a sell, foods you don’t recognize and what seems like general chaos. After frequenting the market almost weekly for a few months I’m starting to understand the method behind the madness.

An example of unfamiliar foods: If anyone knows what this is please let me know.

An example of unfamiliar foods: If anyone knows what this is please let me know.

IMG_0016

First understand how the market is set up. One thing to note is that for the most part vendors are always in the same spot. This becomes helpful as you build relationships. That way you can find the same tomato vendor over and over. Also don’t be afraid to go down alleys and side streets. Many times vendors who are not on the main drag are more willing to bargain because they don’t get the same amount of traffic. Once you find that special vender ask for what you want. This may seem elementary, but sometimes the vendor is set up in front of their brick and mortar shop, so if you don’t see an item they would likely sell, just ask. They have more items in the back. 

Learn how to bargain. The greatest appeal about open air markets is the ability to bargain shop and haggle prices. I learned from a Korean national that it’s part of the Korean culture to haggle.  The thing she didn’t tell me was that as a foreigner the same bargaining rules don’t apply. When Korean vendors see Americans they know our method of shopping is to see a price and pay, so many won’t haggle with you because they know that’s not your culture. This doesn’t mean haggling is impossible it just means that your shopping experience isn’t going to be the same way as your well-meaning Korean friend’s trip.

Here are some tips to improve your haggling experience.

1) Get a Calendar – Make yourself familiar with traditional Korean holidays. The market tends to be more crowded and vendors are far less likely to haggle with you on those days. They don’t need your business that day and they don’t have time to waste going back and forth with you for fear of losing another sale.

2) Get the Worm -As in the early bird… Get it?! Anyways, I just mean go early. The earlier in the day the better. The earliest I’ve been is 8 am. Sure some vendors aren’t set up yet, but the truly committed die-hard vendors are and they are ready to make their first sale. There is a cultural belief that your interaction with your first customer is how the rest of the day will go for your business. So theoretically they are more willing to bargain to get a sale. Superstition aside, in my own experience I have found that vendors are just nicer in the mornings and therefore more likely to give you a deal, even if you aren’t their first customer. Another plus is that the market is less crowded, though still crowded, in the morning; so it makes for a more pleasant shopping experience.

3) Get an expanded definition of bargain. Many people only think they got a good deal if they paid less than the asking price. Sometimes that’s hard to achieve. I frequent vendors who throw in free items or who who give me significantly more for the same price compared to other vendors. This takes some trial and error and a good memory.  I try to remember specific vendors for specific items because of their generosity with portions. Like my raw nuts lady. She puts more in the bag than other vendors and puts a free item in as well. I also appreciate vendors who will fairly cut an amount down for me. Sometimes the vendors pre-portion their produce (say that five times fast) and you pick the basket of produce that looks best. But it’s just my husband and I at home, so often their portions are too large and I know a large amount will go to waste. There are some vendors who try to force you to buy the whole amount. It could be because they’ve already weighed out the produce, but it doesn’t serve my purposes. Others will cut the fruit in half to their advantage. Meaning the entire pound was 5,00 won but for 3,000 won they’ll give you half. I don’t use them. I like when I get just a little more than half for about half the price. it means they value you me as a customer and want me to come back. Either way, there are more than one way to get a good deal. For instance, we use a lot of organic Korean honey (seriously, whatever these Korean bees are doing, it’s life changing). So rather than ask my vendor for a cheaper deal on the honey, I buy double the portion and then cut a deal on that. I know I’m going to use all of the honey, so it’s a win for me, and he moved merchandise, so its a win for him.

4) Get o.k. with “N.O.”. Sometimes you have to walk away. I’ve heard stories of Americans buying items and not knowing what they bought because a vendor started putting it in a bag as they were talking and shoved it in their hands. I can’t even imagine being bullied into a purchase just because I’m afraid the vendor won’t like Americans afterwards. I think that’s a simplistic and insulting view of people in foreign nations, to think that a seasoned vendor won’t know how to handle a “no thank you” (but that’s a different, more political view that would probably be titled: Polite Paternalism). Anyways, the point is that if in the midst of haggling you aren’t getting the deal you want, walk away. It’s ok. I am not afraid to walk away from any vendor, nor am afraid to try several vendors to see whose willing to haggle. I’m also okay with hearing “no.” Some say no as a bargaining method. Try another number. But if they are insistent on the price, then I smile, bow, and walk away. No hard feelings. You don’t have to be rude to bargain, but you don’t have to be a pushover either. Sit back from a distance, you’ll see them bargaining with other locals. Many just assume that you won’t.

5) Get a basic vocabulary. I’m pretty horrible at other languages, speaking wise. But I have found that even recognizing a few words is helpful, even if I can’t respond. The vendors are less frustrated if you understand something, and actually appreciate a few words in Hangul (Korean). Words that I have found to be useful are:

Hello = Ann-yeong-haseyo (all the translation books say to pronounce it this way. Locally, I find Ah-naseyo gets a better response)

Thank You = Kasi-hamm-ni-dah

How Much = Ooh-ma-im-ni-kah

Please Give Me = Joos-Aa-Yo

Yes = Nay or Dae

No = Aneeyo

Once you get the basics of the marketplace down, it can really be worthwhile. Before the market our grocery bill could easily be $300 a month for 2 people and that was with little to no fresh fruits or vegetables. Now I spend about $250 on groceries and that is with about half being large amounts of fresh produce, and of course local honey (I use it for almost everything that requires a sweetener). Here are some pictures from a typical trip:

IMG_0075

I think I spent less than 15,000 won on this trip with 10,000 won being the honey. Still a good deal, but this was one of my earlier trips, before I’d grasped the concept of bargaining.

This is a more recent trip. Even with the superior honey I spent about 30000w

I love seeing twists on foods I grew up with or foods I've never even heard of.

I love seeing twists on foods I grew up with or foods I’ve never even heard of.



They say the way to a man’s heart is through his stomach; and if home is where the heart is, then my home is in the kitchen…

Okay now that I’ve gotten all of my anecdotes and puns out of the way I thought I’d add a new element to the blog. 

I love to cook and I love to eat (thus I devote a lot of posts to weight loss. LOL). One thing I’ve been trying is making healthier spins on some favorites. Not every recipes will be “healthy” per se and I won’t pretend to be a nutritionist. I’m just a gal who loves to cook and who married a man with a military sized appetite. 

Anyone who cooks knows there’s no science to it. I’m an intuitive cook. Sometimes I hit on a win, sometimes not so much. Last night was a win. 

I saw a recipe for Lemon Cream -Sauced Mahi Mahi. I revised it and then  I paired it with fried rice from the night before and cabbage salad. 

  

Mahi Mahi with Lemon Cream sauce

Ingredients

  • Mahi Mahi fillets
  • Garlic Salt
  • Black Pepper (coursely ground)
  • 4 Tbsp. Lemon Juice (fresh)
  • 1 Tbsp. White Cooking Wine
  • 1 Tbsp. Brandy
  • 3 Tbsp. Cream Cheese (whipped)
  • 2 Tbsp. Cashew Milk
  • 1/4c Butter / 2 pats of Butter
  • 2 Tbsp. Raw Sugar
  • 1/4c water

Method

  1. Note: This recipe cooks very quickly so don’t leave the stove. 
  2. Season fish well with garlic salt and pepper. Preheat skillet to medium heat. Steam fish with half the butter in a pan  with a lid for 10 minutes. Turn pan down very low with lid and with water to keep moist. 
  3. In a seperate skillet: Melt cream cheese on a med-low heat. Add lemon juice, brandy, and white wine. Whisk until blended. Bring to a slight boil and immediately reduce the heat to a simmer.  The cream cheese may appear to curdle this is normal. Add a splash of cashew milk (about 2 Tbsp.). Add remainder of butter and whisk well. Then add sugar while stirring.  Simmer about 5 minutes to allow the sauce to thicken. Remove from heat and allow it to sit 5 more minutes. Sauce should appear eggshell white with a creamy consistency. 
  4. Serve over fish and garnish with herbs or sliced peppers. 

Review

I loved this fish recipe it was just the right amount of sweet and savory. Typically I pair some kind of mango chutney with Mahi Mahi but I wanted a change and I’m so glad I tried something new. I think this would be a great recipe for a dinner party. 

My husband loves it as well. He let out an audible “mmm” when he tasted it. 

Side Dishes

Red Cabbage Salad with Mango Vinagrette

Ingredients

Salad

  • 4c Red Cabbage (Half a head)
  • 1c Asian Pear
  • 1/2c Carrot (finely diced)
  • 1/4c Celery
  • 1/4c Bell Pepper
  • 1 Tbsp Lemon Concentrate
  • 1/4c almonds (chopped)
  • 1 Tbsp dried cranberries (optional)

Vinagrette 

  • 1/4c Mango (diced)
  • 1/8c water
  • 2 Tbsp Honey
  • 6 Tbsp Apple Cider Vinegar
  • 2 Tbsp Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Method

  1. In a large bowl mix salad ingredients with lemon juice. 
  2. Add craisins and nuts. 
  3. In a blender purée the mango with water. Then combine the purée with the othe Vinagrette ingredients in a smaller bowl.
  4. Toss salad and Vinagrette together. Chill until ready to serve. 

Review

This salad is a spinoff of a recipe I found on Pinterest. The original recipe called for apple as instead of Asian pears. Since I’m in Korea right now Asian Pears are far more plentiful than apples. 

I really enjoyed this salad. It was very refreshing. I thought it paired well with the citrus flavor of the fish sauce. I had a first mind to skip the craisins and only have fresh produce in the salad. I now think that would have been the best. The salad is crunchy and full of flavor. The addition of dried fruit takes from the fresh taste. 

My husband also preferred the salad without cranberries and I’m glad I only put a small amount. However I wouldn’t discourage others from adding the craisins, we love them, it’s just our preference with this very specific pairing. My husband also said to lose the almonds.  I have to veto him on this one. They added a healthy crunch to the salad. He’s just adjusting to a healthier lifestyle. 

Restaurant-Style Vegetable Fried Rice

Ingredients 

  • 2 Tbsp Green onions (diced)
  • 1/2 c Red and Yellow Peppers
  • 1 c Frozen Peas and Carrots
  • 2 Eggs (beaten or whisked)
  • 2 Tbsp Soy Sauce
  • 2 Tbsp Honey
  • 3 c Brown Rice (cooked and refrigerated)
  • 2 Tbsp Olive Oil
  • Cooked chicken, beef, or shrimp (optional)

Method

  1. Preheat a skillet to medium heat and add olive oil. Cook onion and peppers until tender and then add frozen vegetables. Push to the side or in a seperate skillet cook the eggs. Allow them to cook almost all the way through before dicing. Once cooked mix with vegetables. Add rice to the mixture, stirring occasionally until heated through. 
  2. In a small sauce pan combine soy sauce and honey.  Cook on medium-low heat until honey has completely dissolved. 
  3. Remove both pans from hat and pour soy-honey sauce over the fried rice. 

Review

We love fried rice. My favorite was from this restaurant that had the slightest sweet flavor to offset the saltiness of the soy sauce. I can’t even remember the restaurant name anymore but I have found that adding a bit of honey provides a very similar flavor. I often add chicken apple sausage to the mix and it is divine. I didn’t this time and I’m glad because it would have destracted from the fish.  




{September 1, 2015}   September Fitness Challenge

My fitness challenge for September is to maintain my walking at the higher end. Last week alone I walked 36 miles (about 91,000 steps). Rather than go for a higher rate, I want to maintain a consistency. Right now I can go anywhere from 12 miles a week to nearly 40 miles. So I’ve got the mileage down, not to step up the intensity and variety.

  1. Steps: Walk at least 60,000 steps a week. This will equal approximately 24 miles. I think this is a happy median that will keep me from having “lazy” weeks.
  2. Strength: I am entering into an ab challenge this month. I need to focus more on strength.
  3. Scheduled Classes: I am really getting into HIIT workouts so I am challenging myself to 2/ week. This particular YouTube channel, Millionaire Hoy,  has a variety of HIIT workouts that are tough but doable for me. I will also continue with my yoga each week.
  4. Substance: If I could just focus on working out and not my food intake it would be a great world. But I have to be honest with myself. My progress is never going to speed up if I don’t get my food under control. No crazy diets or outlandish promises. There is a 7 day challenge going around. For the last week I’ve been doing a fairly good job of sticking to these relatively simple rules. It’s not precise nutrition guidance, but I just need something that’s workable for me and something I will stick to.

I am also challenging myself to provide more frequently. Unlike other bloggers I follow who are working on releasing weight, I have the fitness and nutrition knowledge. It’s the consistency that get me every time. So while I am pushing myself physically, my challenges are equally focused on practicing the habit of habit. Meaning, I am trying to get consistent exercise at specific times ingrained in my psyche and in my muscles’ memory.

Finally, I’m not in love with my ab challenge so if someone finds a better one that is effective, fun, and has variety I would appreciate it.

  

UPDATE

I am proud to announce that I met my challenge and then some during the month of September. I walked and/ or ran 115 miles in September!!!! it helps that walking is my primary mode of transportation. 

I also lost 6 lbs in September!!!!!

I attended my classes, especially yoga and I had designated dessert days. I did eat bread but significantly less than normal. So I am feeling good and ready to to start a new challenge. 



{August 28, 2015}   August Fitness Goals Update

My body is getting used to the heat and constant walking so weight loss has slowed but not stopped. So that’s always a good thing. I’ll have to get back to you about how many inches I’ve lost (I lost my tape measurer lol. ) but I have released 10 lbs so that’s makes me very happy. I need to start watching my diet a little more.  In Korea, we eat a lot of rice so that has been tricky for me.

Yoga has been my fitness class of choice about 2 days a week and every now and then I do a hula fitness class. Let me tell you hula is deceptive. I had no idea how much my abs would be engaged for an entire hour at a time! Thus, abs that are on fire the next day. Lol. I also tried my has at cross fit but with all the walking I already do (on average 7-10miles a day) it just felt like too much at this point. I’m getting my water in which explains my fascination with Korean bathrooms right now. 🙂 Overall I am pleased with the progress. It’s especially gratifying when others notice… I went to pay my rent the other day and my realtor exclaimed, “oh my! You’re shrinking!” Thanks for noticing. 🙂

P.S. In August I lost 2.5 inches!



{August 1, 2015}   August Fitness Challenge

Challenges

For the month of August I am taking my fitness challenges in a different direction. As in indoors LOL. It’s monsoon season but its hot! Like sweating in the rain hot. So I decided that to avoid anymore dehydration issues, I should take it inside. There are several fitness classes on the base so my challenge this month is to:

– Drink at least 30 more ounces of water a day (this is actually going to be difficult, how much water can one person drink!).

– Attend 30 fitness classes this month or do this HIIT workout on days I don’t go on base. However, I am also challenging myself to at least attend a class one class every 3 days.

– I also challenge myself to apply to at least 3 jobs a week (It’s hard to work overseas, but I think even the act of applying is mentally stimulating)

– Bonus challenge is to attend one social event each week. This is mostly because its easy to get into a rut and only hang around people in your service member’s squadron, except very few of the service members are married or accompanied in my husband’s squadron. So hopefully this will help me think out of the box as far as socializing.



et cetera